Tyson Foods Facing Criminal Investigation for Polluting Water and Killing Fish

Written by Erica Meier

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In addition to being exposed in undercover videos for shocking animal abuse, Tyson Foods has been in the news for food safety issues, meat recalls, and worker safety issues that have resulted in federal fines. Now, this multinational corporation – which is the second largest meat producer in the world – is the focus of a criminal investigation by the Environmental Protection Agency.

According to the Wall Street Journal, the EPA’s investigation is centered on allegations that “highly acidic” waste-water, possibly containing waste from animal feed supplements, was released from Tyson’s processing plant in Monett, Missouri into the city sewers. This waste-water may have been so toxic that it overburdened the water treatment system, causing high levels of ammonia to spill into a nearby creek – and that resulted in the death of at least 100,000 fish.

This spill happened earlier this year, in May. And in June, the Missouri attorney general filed a civil lawsuit against Tyson. According to the complaint, “As a result of the interference with the sewage plant and the pass through of chemicals from the Monett facility, the water quality in the tributary and Clear Creek was degraded and fish and other wildlife were killed in the tributary and over a four mile stretch of Clear Creek.”

It’s been well-established that factory farming and related animal agribusiness practices not only cause tremendous suffering of farmed animals raised behind closed doors – but they’re also one of the leading causes of environmental degradation, which also harms wildlife, even to the point of extinction.

The good news is that we can help protect all animals and the planet every time we sit down to eat, simply by choosing vegetarian foods. Start today by requesting a free copy of our popular Easy Vegan Recipes booklet!

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